How To Make Duke’s Mayonnaise

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Duke’s mayonnaise, in the south, I was told that there is not one self-respecting Southern lady that does not keep Duke’s mayo on hand and I truly believe Duke’s mayo in the South is considered a mother sauce. There is the Grateful Dead and the Rolling Stones cult and apparently, there is the Duke’s mayonnaise cult. There is the saying: run, do not walk to Duke’s Mayonnaise and then there is the story of the man on his death bed who asked for a tomato sandwich made with Duke’s mayo. Duke’s mayonnaise has been a staple below the Mason-Dixon Line for 100 years, some say it may be the best.

Duke’s mayonnaise

Duke's mayonnaise

I have been using Duke’s mayonnaise and agree that Duke’s is a great mayonnaise. The thought of posting a great mayonnaise scratch recipe without preservatives and stabilizers came to me after having dinner at a small restaurant in Chicago. The recipe for the Duke’s mayo is from one of my favorite cookbooks, Pickles, Pigs & Whiskey from Chef John Currence.  Just the mayonnaise recipe that the chef John has in his book is worth purchasing his book.

Duke's mayonnaise

Mayonaise like everything else, eaten in moderation is not bad for you

The emphasis is on moderation. Homemade mayo is really easy to make and tastes delicious. There are no additional emulsifiers and preservatives to make it dense and the taste is delicious plus you know that it is wholesome and good for you. Just make it on a “need” basis, it takes only minutes to make!  Store-bought mayonnaise is made from egg yolk, oil, mustard, lemon juice, and vinegar, which the same homemade mayo is made of.

EDTA:

Did you know that store purchased mayo adds amongst other things to the mix calcium disodium EDTA, a preservative that improves the shelf life? ETDA is a chemical salt used to separate heavy metals from dyes and other substances. One from calcium disodium EDTA, appears in foods, like mayonnaise and cosmetic products to prevent air from spoiling them. In addition, it’s frequently used in products like laundry detergents, industrial germicides, and other cleaning products. EDTA is an FDA-recognized chemical preservative and has been banned by Whole Foods Market which cites it as “Unacceptable in food.

Duke's mayonnaise

Basically adding calcium disodium, EDTA prevents the mayo has disagreeable odors or tastes from decomposing oils. EDTA prevents the mayonnaise from getting rancid and that is the reason that store-bought mayo keeps for about 9 months while the homemade version should be consumed in 2 weeks. The FDA indicates that Calcium disodium EDTA is safe in small amounts found in food as a preservative. However, I agree with Whole Foods, a food additive, and ingredient that is used in cosmetic and industrial products, laundry detergents, industrial germicides, and other cleaning products I don’t need in my food.

What oils are best for Mayo

Life without mayonnaise, just think about it. Homemade “Duke’s” mayo is one condiment I cannot live without.
Sunflower oil, olive oil, peanut oil, and blended oils all can be used for making a fresh-made mayo. I personally don’t care for avocado oil in mayo however for salad dressing cooking etc. the best oil is Olive oil. So peanut oil works for me however that does not mean that you not should explore using other oils. Remember cooking is about exploring flavors, so I’m not dictating what kind of oil someone should use to make homemade mayo.

Duke's mayonnaise

How To Make Duke's Mayonnaise, a Southern Mother Sauce

Chef Norbert
Mayonaise like everything else eaten in moderation is not bad for you, however, the emphasis is on moderation
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 20 mins
Course Sauces
Cuisine French
Servings 32 portions
Calories 211 kcal

Recommended Equipment

1 Pyrex Measuring Cups
1 Measuring Spoon Set
1 KitchenAid® Mixer

Ingredients
 
 

  • 3 each egg yolk use organic pasteurized eggs
  • 2 tsp mustard dry powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder powder
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp sugar granulated
  • 3.5 cups peanut oil
  • 1 tbsp white vinegar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1 pinch pepper

Instructions
 

Blend egg yolk

  • Combine egg yolks, dry mustard powder, onion powder, sugar, and lemon juice and whisk in blender at high speed
    3 each egg yolk, 2 tsp mustard, 1 tsp onion powder, 2 tsp lemon, 2 tsp sugar

DRIZZLE the oil

  • DRIZZLE the oil at high speed until there is a thick emulsion. Beware the oil needs to be added slowly otherwise the mayo will separate .
    3.5 cups peanut oil

Add vinegar

  • Add vinegar, salt, and pepper and blend well.
    1 tbsp white vinegar, 1 pinch salt, 1 pinch pepper

Chef Notes

Remember your fresh-made mayo has no added preservatives.
Never keep your mayonnaise at room temperature for more than 1 hour.
Keep your fresh mayo in the refrigerator and it should last about a week.
In case the Mayonaise separates, the way to bring the mayo back to life is to take two tablespoons of the broken mayo, place it in a bowl and add about 1 teaspoon of Ice water and whisk at high speed until the mayo emulsifies again. The cold water will bind the oil and the egg. Then add slooooowly the rest of the broken mayo and mix at high speed until emulsified.
 

Nutrition

Serving: 1oz | Calories: 211kcal | Carbohydrates: 1g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 24g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 8g | Monounsaturated Fat: 11g | Cholesterol: 1mg | Sodium: 5mg | Potassium: 2mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g

Nutrition information is calculated using an ingredient database and should be considered an estimate

Keyword Mayonnaise
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Join the Conversation

  1. Stacy Ilderton says:

    Can you use another type of oil or does it have to be peanut oil?

    1. Norbert Author says:

      Sunflower oil, olive oil, peanut oil, and blended oils all can be used for making a fresh-made mayo. I personally don’t care for avocado oil in mayo however for salad dressing cooking etc. the best oil is Olive oil. So peanut oil works for me however that does not mean that you not should explore using other oils. Remember cooking is about exploring flavors, so I’m not dictating what kind of oil someone should use to make homemade mayo. 

      1. Stacy Ilderton says:

        Thank you for the info! I love trying new things out in the kitchen

  2. Jerry Hogeland says:

    How long will the mayo last

    1. Norbert Author says:

      Remember your fresh-made mayo has no added preservatives.
      Never keep your mayonnaise at room temperature for more than 1 hour.
      Keep your fresh mayo in the refrigerator and it should last about a week. Enjoy, best NB

  3. Sadly, Duke’s has gone the way of many brands. In order to cut their expenses, they have added something not necessary at all. Water. So does Hellman’s. I remember reading the ingredients for Dukes years ago. Water was not one of the ingredients. And why they at least don’t add chemical fillers, water is a filler nevertheless. So homemade mayo is probably the way to go. But just know that the recipe here is no longer Duke’s recipe.

    1. Norbert Author says:

      Agreed homemade mayo is the way to go.
      Thank you for the great feedback

  4. My wife and I made it it was good to me not to her but we are thinking we added to oil and it wasnt peanut oil it was vegetable oil

  5. Did not emulsify at all. I’m very disappointed, especially to have wasted so much oil.

    1. Norbert Author says:

      Very likely you added too much oil at the same time. Oil needs to be added slowly.
      The way to bring the mayo back to live is to take two or tablespoons of the broken mayo, place in a bowl and add add about 1/2 a teaspoon of Ice water and mix at high speed until it emulsifies again. The ice water will bind the oil and the egg.
      Then add slooooowly the rest of the broken mayo and mix at high speed until emulisfied. Sorry that it not work for you.

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